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What is the difference between a fat and slim chance?

Best summarised in this joke: you've got two chances fat and slim - and slim has just left town.

In other words a slim chance is a remote possibility while fat chance means no chance at all.

Cassell's Dictionary of Slang
Green's Dictionary of Slang: Three-volume set

Comments

  1. This word has been redundantly used to tease many obese people: "fat chance or slim chance" of trimming down their weight. If perhaps such individuals would order and take hoodia, then maybe it would increase the slim chance of getting thin.

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  2. The two terms is pretty literal if you look at it closely, you'll get fat if you let off your own self in giving up on being slim. As we all know, it'll all depends on how a person looks at it, therefore, being healthy and energetic will rely on how a person looks at himself.

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  3. These descriptions are used abusively by children and teenagers, such that it is the usual cause for inferiority complex to develop. It is vital that parents guide children from the very start in being responsible with the words that come out of their mouth.

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