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Showing posts from April, 2019

Why 'Maundy' Thursday?

The first citation of maunde  to describe the Thursday before Easter in middle English comes in the mid-15C. It described not only The Last Supper in general but also the ceremony of the washing of the feet of the poor or downtrodden.

The immediate origin was Old French mandé. This in turn derived from the Latin mandatum or "commandment" (see mandate (n.)).

For Christians the crucial reference is to the opening words of the Latin church service for this day, Mandatum novum do vobis "A new commandment I give unto you" (John xiii:34). This new commandment is to love one another: the supreme example of which will be the events of the following day.

What is Passover? Where does the word come from?

Why do we say 'Good' Friday?

It may seem odd that Christians call their day of greatest sorrowGoodFriday


The confusion arises from how we perceive the word 'Good'. Here it is used in the archaic sense of 'holy' or momentous.

Good Friday, called Feria VI in Parasceve in the Roman Missalhe hagia kai megale paraskeue (the Holy and Great Friday) in the Greek LiturgyHoly Friday in Romance Languages, Charfreitag (Sorrowful Friday) in German, is the English designation of Friday in Holy Weeksource

In other words, Good marks the uniqueness of the Passion. It affirms the centrality of the crucifixion and resurrection to the Christian faith.

Where does the word Easter come from?

The word Easter is not in the New Testament. Nor does it feature in most translations of the Bible into vernacular languages.