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Should Elvis have been 'shaken up"?

shake up
1. To upset by or as if by a physical jolt or shock: was badly shaken up by the accident.  Source Freedictionary.com
I've never even had an idea for a song. Just once, maybe. I went to bed one night, had quite a dream, and woke up all shook up. I phoned a pal and told him about it. By morning, he had a new song, 'All Shook Up'.  Elvis Presley (interview on October 28, 1957[3])
The song Elvis inspired and then performed gives the phrasal verb to shake up a modern twist. The idea that young love could have a traumatic emotional impact is not novel (see Shakespeare et al) but here it is cleverly linked to Presley's scandalous 'shaking hips' image.


There has been a lot of learned discussion as to whether  'shook up' should technically be 'shaken' up - see comments here. What is undeniable is that a (supposedly) grammatically correct version of the lyric would not have have inspired countless Karaoke performances and Elvis impressions.
A well I bless my soul 
What's wrong with me? 

I'm itching like a man on a fuzzy tree. 
My friends say I'm actin' wild as a bug. 
I'm in love 
I'm all shaken up 
Mm mm oh, oh, yeah, yeah!
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